Unicode Fractions

Character Name Character Entity (Named) Entity (Decimal) Entity (Hex)
VULGAR FRACTION 1/2 ½ ½ &‌#189;
VULGAR FRACTION 1/3 &‌#8531;
VULGAR FRACTION 2/3 &‌#8532;
VULGAR FRACTION 1/4 ¼ ¼ &‌#188;
VULGAR FRACTION 3/4 ¾ ¾ &‌#190;
VULGAR FRACTION 1/5 &‌#8533;
VULGAR FRACTION 2/5 &‌#8534;
VULGAR FRACTION 3/5 &‌#8535;
VULGAR FRACTION 4/5 &‌#8536;
VULGAR FRACTION 1/6 &‌#8537;
VULGAR FRACTION 5/6 &‌#8538;
VULGAR FRACTION 1/7 &‌#8528;
VULGAR FRACTION 1/8 &‌#8539;
VULGAR FRACTION 3/8 &‌#8540;
VULGAR FRACTION 5/8 &‌#8541;
VULGAR FRACTION 7/8 &‌#8542;
VULGAR FRACTION 1/9 &‌#8529;
VULGAR FRACTION 1/10 &‌#8530;


Which entity should I use?

HTML offers three ways to encode special characters like fractions: numeric hex, numeric decimal, and named entities. All three types are equally valid and have been fully supported by all major browsers for years. They work with any encoding, so it's generally up to personal preference.

You can read more about entities here.

What does it mean if there's no entity listed?

Most fractions don't actually have named entities. These still work fine in browsers -- you just have to represent them with the numeric entity (either decimal or hex).

Why are they called vulgar fractions?

This is actually a mathematical term, not an HTML or Unicode one! The term vulgar fraction originally comes from the Latin adjective vulgaris, which comes from vulgus -- the common people. Vulgar in this usage is synonymous with common (as opposed to decimals, which were originally called decimal fractions.)

What browsers support unicode fractions?

All modern browsers support unicode fractions.

What if I want a unicode fraction that's not listed here?

If the fraction you want to create isn't listed above, you can create your own by using the fraction slash (U+2044) and Unicode's superscript and subscript numerals: e.g. ³⁄₄₇. You can read more about Unicode subscripts and superscripts on Wikipedia.



Brought to you by Justin Duke. I hope your shower hits the perfect temperature immediately.